Saturday, 12 January 2008

How bizarre!

We've been invited out to dinner tonight for raclette at a friend's house. I'll be interested to see how their authentic french raclette differs to what I serve up. Because our invite is for 730pm, the time that I am usually breathing a sigh of relief that both kids are asleep, I decided to make some scones for le goûter to keep us going until dinner.

I'm still working out my issues with the pre-mixed raising agent they have here. It comes in tiny little packets. I have no idea how much to use and usually end up guessing. I really need to find some cream of tartar so I can just mix my own with bicarb soda (which I have finally found!). Despite this, the scones turned out ok. I was not so lucky with the cream though. We have some yummy strawberry jam (I'm a big fan of the Monoprix Gourmet range of foods) so I started to beat up some cream to go with it. After about ten minutes of whisking, my cream was only slightly thicker. So, I got out my electric beater and after another five minutes, it was still only the consistency of melted icecream , you know slightly thicker than cream but a long way off standing up on its own. I checked the pack - nothing there to indicate it couldnt be whipped, in fact, there were even directions on how to make Chantilly cream, so it must be whippable. I perservered for a bit longer and then gave up. We ate our scones with jam and almost runny cream. If held at the right angle, you could even get the scone into your mouth before the cream slid off it. At least, they tasted good...

le goûter afternoon tea

10 comments:

Guera said...

Are you at high altitude? That can make a difference with anything that needs air in it (whipping, baking cakes etc). When we lived in the Alps we had to adjust our cooking methods quite a bit, including boiling eggs longer since the boiling point is lower at high altitude. Otherwise, I would say try a different type of cream. I bought the wrong kind and tried whipping it for what seemed like hours to no avail!

Patricia said...

I had that same problem in Annecy. Twice! Second time we chilled the bowl and the metal beaters and it still stayed thin. A local might know better.

Rosebank Magic said...

The standard mix to turn plain flour into SR flour is 2 teaspoons of baking powder to a cup of flour. Give that a try and let me know ho you go.
I'll be interested to hear about the raclette night.

Tigue said...

from what I understand you can buy crea of tartar at the pharmacy and no where else...not sure what they call it in french though. I brougth ym own ti with me. As to the whipping cream...I made cream puffs the other night and couldnt get my cream to whip either :(

Tigue said...

btw sorry for all the typos...thats what I get for not proof reading!

Destination Metz said...

scones! yum. publish the receipe! i miss devonshire tea..

Bros said...

You will need to buy double cream (or whipping cream) - not pouring cream.....

is the same at home - if you buy pouring cream and try to whip it, all you will get is a sore wrist. Soemthing to do with the percentage fat in it.

Dunno what they will call it in french though, but that is the story!

Bros said...

Look what I found......

http://www.theworldwidegourmet.com/?action=ingredient_show&id=631&lg=en

good luck!

Penny said...

Thanks all. I think I will do as Bros suggested and try and buy whipping cream.

BTW Bros, if you read this - what was it that you found at the worldwide gourmet as the link is broken :)

Bros said...

All about WHIPPING CREAM
Liquid crème fraîche
Crème fleurette




More than 30% butterfat
French: crème à fouetter



In France, whipping cream contains at least 30% butterfat.
In Canada, whipping cream contains between 32 and 40% fat, though 35% is the kind most often found on the market.

In the United States, light whipping cream (30-36% fat) is differentiated from heavy whipping cream (more than 36% fat).


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Hints and tips
To make successful whipped cream, it's best to chill the cream at least 24 hours before using it. When using an electric mixer, chill the bowl and whisk before whipping the cream as well. When the cream and the utensils are all very cold, the cream will absorb more air and attain more volume. If made under the right conditions, it should hold for 24 hours if refrigerated.
A small quantity of light cream is usually enough to rescue overwhipped cream