Sunday, 25 November 2007

Une coupe de cheveux

I managed to survive my first hair cut in France without too much trouble. Armed with some handy phrases like séparé a la côté (Thanks Gen!) dégradé and pas trop court, I managed to explain what I wanted (or thought I did!) and was able to chat a bit with my coiffeur about Australia (he hadnt forgotten). Things were going pretty well until we got to the blow dry. He kindly offered me the choice of two types - something completely unintelligible or something else that sounded like naturellement. So, I chose the latter - bad move! After about 15 minutes with the diffuser, I walked out looking like I just got out of bed (and not in a good, sexy, just got out of bed way either - that's quite beyond me!).

So I flattened it down while I walked home and then, having a good look in the mirror, I realized he had committed the same mistake that most hairdressers do with my hair. For some reason they insist on layering it through the centre when I wear it parted on the side. The upshot of this is I end up with one side much more layered than the other. So after walking around the house cursing all hairdressers australian and french (with the exception of the wonderful Jo at Brisbane City Stefan - yes, Stefan the last bastion of old ladies, I know, but she's a great cutter), I then locked myself in the bathroom armed with the scissors and layered the other side myself.

And two days on, having washed it, I must say I'm pretty happy...


séparé a la côté parted on the side
dégradé layered
pas trop court not too short

7 comments:

Samantha said...

Hi Penny!

Just a tip for next time - côté in this case is masculine, so it wouldn't be "séparé à la côté", which might be why he didn't understand that you wore a side part.

A part is called "une raie" in French, so they normally ask something along the lines of "De quel côté mets-tu ta raie?", to which you would either answer "du côté droit", "du côté gauche" or "au milieu".

But congratulations on surviving your first hair cut in France! I remember when I did the same - I looked up a few key words before going in, used a lot of hand gestures and then just hoped for the best, LOL!!

mammaclaudia said...

It's always hard to find a good hairdresser, someone who really understands what you want... but it's even harder to find one in a foreign country (well, it's not a foreign country for you anymore... is it?). Anyway, I'll think I'll have an haircut before leaving... just in case...

guera said...

As you already know it took me over a year to get the courage to have my hair cut here in Mexico. The result wasn't bad, but I am still happier with my hairdresser at home who has been cutting my hair for about 18 years now!) I'm impressed you have the skills to fix it yourself! Maybe you can do the whole thing yourself next time??!!

Penny said...

Samantha - thanks for the tips! I'll remember them for next time :)

Claudia - that's what I did and I got it cut a bit shorter to last me longer. And yes, its definitely still a foreign country for me - even though its where my home is :)

Guera - I can do a bit of layering but I dont think I could do the lot!

French for a While said...

Oh good, so it's not just us. Even you have 'faux pas' moments.

Jennie said...

I always have the same problem wherever I get my hair cut - they never layer it right regardless of where I part my hair. I know how annoying that is!

Grominou2 said...

Glad I could help! ;-)